From the Editor-in-Chief of SOA World Magazine

Sean Rhody

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Top Stories by Sean Rhody

To paraphrase, "I come not to praise the Browser, but to bury it." Because the cold hard fact of application development is that the browser needs to die. Immediately. It's already caused more than enough damage. This may seem to be a harsh statement. After all, the browser was responsible for the explosion of the Internet. It serves many useful purposes and people do billions of dollars worth of business through it every year. Seemingly, I should be praising the browser, not calling for its execution. Nevertheless, the browser needs to go, and we all know it. It's the dirty secret of the IT world, one we never like to talk about - as a mechanism for delivering a GUI, the browser stinks. Stinks isn't even a strong enough word. The browser was intended to deliver text across the Internet, and it's good at that. So good that people began to piggyback other things onto... (more)

Why Superman Works Alone

Toward the end of the last Batman movie, when Robin is giving Batman a hard time, George Clooney gets fed up and says, "This is why Superman works alone." While I'm often tempted to think along the same lines, the reality of our business is that we work in teams. This leads to the topic of this month's diatribe: team development. Large-scale software development is a complex process. The majority of it takes place in a corporate environment that requires rigor and process. The most familiar of these processes is usually the task of obtaining the blessing of the DBA for your datab... (more)

Management 101

From time to time I hear people say "those who can, do; those who can't, manage." Usually a developer mutters this as he begins another 80-hour week courtesy of a slip in the project plan. Of course, once you get to be management yourself, you realize there's more to it than simply ticking off hours on a project plan. This holds true for application servers as well as development teams. It seems that development features often take precedence over management in the planning of release cycles for application servers. To a certain extent, this can be pushed up a little in origin,... (more)

SOA Web Services Editorial: Lego My SOA

Just about every publication, marketing brochure, and IT commercial currently on parade for your enjoyment contains some mention of service-oriented architecture. If products were still sold in boxes, instead of downloaded, you would see a bright sticker on the box saying "New and Improved: Now with SOA." Instead of Fuller brushes, today's sales wiz now pushes SOA - it's good for what ails you. Now don't get me wrong - I'm more or less in favor of SOA, although I do believe there are times when it is inappropriate for use. But after all, this is a magazine devoted to SOA, so as ... (more)

SOA Web Services Journal Editorial — The SOA Dichotomy

As editor, I review a great many proposals for articles. A good portion of them deal with SOA, which is to be expected. When I review them, I'm reminded that there are two very different views of SOA, which in my opinion are both equally true. I call this the SOA Dichotomy, because these views seemingly contradict one another. One of the views is that SOA makes things easier for the enterprise. Certainly this view has a great deal of merit and validity. Fully realized a service-oriented architecture allows an organization to fully leverage their investment in the real intellectu... (more)