From the Editor-in-Chief of SOA World Magazine

Sean Rhody

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Top Stories by Sean Rhody

As you can imagine, I spend a lot of time speaking to people about service oriented architecture (and it’s variants for infrastructure and enterprise) and about how best to create a true implementation (or at least, an effective one).  There is a great deal of detail in creating such an artifact – design yes, but also implementation, operational details, governance and a myriad of other tasks that can easily take up a chief architect’s entire day.  These tasks are all vital to the actual creation of the architecture, but for all that they may seem the fundamental first steps in evolving the IT shop, and yet there are even more necessary first steps – selling the concept in the first place. SOA in many ways reminds me of relational database technology. At it’s first inception, the concept of an RDBMS must have had a hard sell.  Sure it made perfect sense to arrange ... (more)

Get the Message

Back in the old days, when you needed to communicate with someone distant, you usually had to send a letter. There was no instant response, and there was no way to tell when your message was received. Now we have always-on e-mail, BlackBerrys, and assorted other devices to make what was once a leisurely (or agonizingly slow) process instantaneous, and synchronous. This issue is about the battle of two idioms - instant, synchronous communication, as championed by the Remote Procedure Call; and asynchronous communication (which may still be instantaneous, but doesn't have to be), ... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Death to the Browser

To paraphrase, "I come not to praise the Browser, but to bury it." Because the cold hard fact of application development is that the browser needs to die. Immediately. It's already caused more than enough damage. This may seem to be a harsh statement. After all, the browser was responsible for the explosion of the Internet. It serves many useful purposes and people do billions of dollars worth of business through it every year. Seemingly, I should be praising the browser, not calling for its execution. Nevertheless, the browser needs to go, and we all know it. It's the dirty sec... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Open Wounds – How Free May End Up Being Costly

Like many people in the industry, I'm torn over open source software. I'm not opposed to developers creating software and deciding they do it for the love of programming, and have no need for payment - if they want to give their work away, I see no reason why they shouldn't be able to do so, although I think the people who want all software to be free should first get uniform agreement from everyone in the industry to work for nothing before they get on that soapbox. Even though I run a magazine in my spare time, I make my living designing software, and I personally don't want to... (more)

How Important Is Security?

Recently, Paris Hilton's cell phone was hacked, and all her contact information was released on the Internet. Although I wasn't important enough to rate a listing, many other celebrities were apparently flooded with phone calls after their private numbers became oh-so-public. While the incident didn't involve Web services, it certainly did involve security, or rather a failure of security. And once again, security itself is the focus of this month's issue. Security has been a topic of this magazine almost since its inception - and we tend to get proposals regarding security on a... (more)